It might be hot, but things are about to get even hotter

I love field work. It’s made my decade of post-secondary education so worth it. And just this last week, I started sampling my PhD field experiment for the last time. I’ve sampled this project in the month of August for 3 straight years now and this year it’s tougher than ever. I think there are at least a couple of reasons for the struggle this year. It’s my last field season and I don’t really know where I’m headed after this. I’ve been comfortable here for years, hanging out in my plots and counting my plants. Beyond the fear of the unknown and the comfort of the familiar, it’s also just stinking HOT. Our readers from Southern Ontario will know well that it’s been a brutal summer here with temperatures averaging the mid to high 30’s with the humidity for well over a month now. That, combined with the lack of rain (wait…what’s rain? It still rains nowadays???), has made sitting in these old abandoned fields slightly less enjoyable, by no means miserable, but certainly not wonderful.

Even though the struggle is real, I’ve persisted. Yesterday the sun was beating down so intensely on the back of my neck that I could have melted. On top of that, the humidity is so high that every piece of clothing no matter how loose clings to your body and of course there’s the deer flies. I sat there, on a bright orange milk crate, in the middle of an old farmer’s field and I thought to myself – why am I still here? I could have given up long ago. How am I persisting?

There’s a few reasons. First, I want to know the answers. I know I can’t answer my questions until I sit my butt down, and count my plants. And I do really, really want to know the answer, so I keep going. Second, I remind myself that it isn’t always like this. I’m not always going to be melting and drenched in sweat. There are lots of ups and downs in fieldwork and although, the heat might be a big downer, there’s still lots of neat things to see and experience that desk life just simply doesn’t permit. Finally, I love sharing the fieldwork experience with others. I love blogging about my experiences and I love giving our readers a true picture of what fieldwork is like. This is part of the experience, an experience most people do not get but would love to have. As field biologists we truly are the lucky ones.

Here at the blog we are even luckier because we get to share our stories with all of you, and because sharing those stories has resulted in so many new and interesting opportunities, collaborations and outreach experiences. Despite the heat Dispatches from the field has been keeping very busy this summer and have been sharing our fieldwork experiences with all kinds of people in all kinds of places. Back in May we went out to the Elbow Lake Environmental Education Centre and did a presentation for Youth. We told some fieldwork stories while also incorporating information about what field biology actually is and the various career opportunities that involve field research.

In June, Sarah took our display up to the QUBS Open House and promoted our blog to those in attendance. This is always such a fun opportunity to showcase the neat research and other endeavors associated with the station and also marked our 2 year anniversary!

In July we gave a talk at the QUBS weekly seminar series that was in collaboration with the Kingston Frontenac Public Library called “The Truth About Stories” where we told the many tales, trials and tribulations of fieldwork in an intimate cottage-esque environment at QUBS.

This week we just completed an interview with GradChat, a weekly radio show with CFRC about our blog. It was a great opportunity to showcase our own research and the blog! We will post a link to that when it’s available next week.

In the fall we are giving the inaugural Kingston Field Naturalists talk for the 2016-17 season and also will be involved with some events with Science Literacy Week so stay tuned and check back for more details about that!

As always thanks for reading and if you’re out in this heat doing fieldwork, stay cool and send us your stories!

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