But first, let me (remember to) take a selfie

When exploring the recent trends of #ScientistsWhoSelfie and #ScientistInHabitat in the science communication Twitterverse, I realize I might belong to the #ScientistsWhoDontSelfie group.  In fact, maybe even the #ScientistsWhoDon’tTakePicturesAtAll group.

As a biologist who gets to go to some really cool places, I always love to share how beautiful those places really are. There’s only one slight problem: I have trouble remembering to take pictures. You can describe a place using words but when a picture is worth a thousand words, there’s no contest which one makes a more lasting impression.

holding on a turtle shell to guide to other side

Helping a turtle cross the road in my handy hiking shoes

I remember asking a former grad student, a seasoned field biologist, what advice she had for me, a new field biologist. She said, “Wear good shoes, bring lots of clothing layers, and remember to take pictures because you always wish you had more”. I had good hiking shoes that survived many steps. I wore every piece of clothing I brought – sometimes all at the same time. But did I take pictures? Not enough!

The thing is, it’s often difficult to take pictures in the field. For one, there were times I was holding a bird in one hand, scrambling through my bag for my measuring device with my other hand, and holding tweezers (clean, of course – at least I hope) in my mouth. Not surprisingly, grabbing my camera was not my top priority. Also, when I finally found a nest after searching all day in the hot sun, I was so tired that all I wanted to do was process the bird and not waste extra time taking a picture.  And it didn’t help that on the first day, the field team leader was frustrated that the team was taking too long with their cameras. Perhaps it was easy for him to say forget about the photos, as he had been coming to that site for years, but for everyone else, it was the first time!

Sarah sitting in the forest

My (third?) attempt at a selfie. It may be dark but at least you can see my whole face!

But despite my completely logical reasons for minimal camera use, when I prepare research seminars or share stories with friends, I am constantly kicking myself that I did not take more pictures.  And the one thing I never seem to have is pictures with me in them!  I have tried to take selfies but that seems to be a skill that I just don’t have. Sometimes you’ll be able to just see the top of my head, while other times you are able to see five of my chins. Luckily for me, the birds don’t seem to mind being models when the camera is pointed towards them.

 

Sarah holding a bird in hand

“Make sure you get my good side”. – warbler

My saving grace, though, is friends who like to take pictures. One of my friends mentioned once that she likes taking pictures when we are out in the field together as I am constantly standing on a rock somewhere or checking something out in the grass. I guess you could say that is my ideal habitat!

Catherine and Sarah kneeling to investigate

Checking out the cool alvar habitat.

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One thought on “But first, let me (remember to) take a selfie

  1. Pingback: What science literacy means to us | Dispatches from the Field

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