Putting the citizen back in science

I love citizen science. It gets people out in nature, learning new skills, and contributes to important goals for science and conservation. Although my current work is focused on conservation , I still contribute to science, as a citizen, in any way that I can. One of my favourite ways is using Ontario Nature’s Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.

Reptiles and amphibians are experiencing declines globally as a result of habitat loss/fragmentation, climate change and predation among many other reasons. In fact, as of April 2018, all of Ontario’s 8 species of turtles are now considered species at risk (SAR) and are at risk of disappearing from the province. Turtles in particular are sensitive to the challenges of living in a human’s world. In general, turtles take a long time to mature, and when even a couple of turtles from a population die, it can have a cascading effect. Turtle eggs are also frequently predated by various other species (i.e. raccoons, foxes, etc.) and many turtles lay eggs in sandy areas next to roads, which puts the turtle and their eggs at serious risk.

What can we do to protect turtles, and the rest of Ontario’s reptiles and amphibians?

Use the Atlas! The Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas is a tool that helps track reptiles and amphibians across Ontario over time.

How does it work?

If you see an amphibian or reptile, report it! You can report it using the app, via -email, using an online form, or snail mail the sighting in. Fill in as many details you can and include a photo if you have one.

You can also use the Atlas to identify amphibians and reptiles using the online field guide and range maps, or find tips for finding a reptile or amphibian near you.

Just the other day, while heading to a site visit, our technician and I spotted a Blandings turtle (threatened in Ontario) in the middle of the road. After being sure the road was clear, we quickly picked up and moved the turtle across the road. The turtle wasn’t thrilled about being moved but it happily waddled away into the marsh along the side of the road when we put it back down. After getting back into the car, we entered the data including location, and this photo into the Atlas. Doing this created a permanent record of our sighting and contributed to our understanding of the distribution of Blandings turtles in Ontario.

The beautiful and shy blandings turtle we rescued from the road

Getting out in the field and contributing to science doesn’t have to be fancy, elaborate and expensive. It can be as easy as spotting an animal and entering the data into an app on your phone! We are all scientists and we can all make a difference!

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One thought on “Putting the citizen back in science

  1. Pingback: Wow, time flies! | Dispatches from the Field

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